Monday, January 22, 2018

IAM Search

Thermocouples

Article Index
Thermocouples
Thermocouple Types
RTDs are completely passive sensing elements, requiring the application of an externally-sourced electric current in order to function as temperature sensors. Thermocouples, however, generate their own electric potential. In some ways, this makes thermocouple systems simpler because the device receiving the thermocouple’s signal does not have to supply electric power to the thermocouple. The self-powering nature of thermocouples also means they do not suffer from the same “self-heating” effect as RTDs. In other ways, thermocouple circuits are more complex than RTD circuits because the generation of voltage actually occurs in two different locations within the circuit, not simply at the sensing point. This means the receiving circuit must “compensate” for temperature in another location in order to accurately measure temperature in the desired location.

Though typically not as accurate as RTDs, thermocouples are more rugged, have greater temperature measurement spans, and are easier to manufacture in different physical forms.


Dissimilar metal junctions

When two dissimilar metal wires are joined together at one end, a voltage is produced at the other end that is approximately proportional to temperature. That is to say, the junction of two different metals behaves like a temperature-sensitive battery. This form of electrical temperature sensor is called a thermocouple:


This phenomenon provides us with a simple way to electrically infer temperature: simply measure the voltage produced by the junction, and you can tell the temperature of that junction. And it would be that simple, if it were not for an unavoidable consequence of electric circuits: when we connect any kind of electrical instrument the iron and copper wires, we inevitably produce another junction of dissimilar metals. The following schematic shows this fact:


Junction J1 is a junction of iron and copper – two dissimilar metals – which will generate a voltage related to temperature. Note that junction J2, which is necessary for the simple fact that we must somehow connect our copper-wired voltmeter to the iron wire, is also a dissimilar-metal junction which will generate a voltage related to temperature. Note also how the polarity of junction J2 stands opposed to the polarity of junction J1 (iron = positive ; copper = negative). A third junction (J3) also exists between wires, but it is of no consequence because it is a junction of two identical metals which does not generate a temperature-dependent voltage at all.

The presence of this second voltage-generating junction (J2) helps explain why the voltmeter registers 0 volts when the entire system is at room temperature: any voltage generated by the ironcopper junctions will be equal in magnitude and opposite in polarity, resulting in a net (series-total) voltage of zero. It is only when the two junctions J1 and J2 are at different temperatures that the voltmeter registers any voltage at all.

We may express this relationship mathematically as follows:


With the measurement (J1) and reference (J2) junction voltages opposed to each other, the voltmeter only “sees” the difference between these two voltages.

Thus, thermocouple systems are fundamentally differential temperature sensors. That is, they provide an electrical output proportional to the difference in temperature between two different points. For this reason, the wire junction we use to measure the temperature of interest is called the measurement junction while the other junction (which we cannot eliminate from the circuit) is called the reference junction (or the cold junction, because it is typically at a cooler temperature than the process measurement junction).




Promotions

  • ...more

Disclaimer

Important: All images are copyrighted to their respective owners. All content cited is derived from their respective sources.

Contact us for information and your inquiries. IAMechatronics is open to link exchanges.

IAMechatronics Login