Monday, May 28, 2018

IAM Search

INDUSTRIAL CONTROL HANDBOOK - 0.6 SUMMARY

Automation can be used to reduce manufacturing costs. It is more appropriately used to improve quality and make it more consistent.

This chapter looked at a Computer Integrated Manufacturing environment, so that users of this book will be able to anticipate the potential third step in the simplify-automate-integrate process as they design individual islands of automated manufacturing.

An automated process must be able to measure and control its output. "Closed loop control" is the term used for a self-controlled automated process. A complete closed loop control system requires an actuator (perhaps several working together), which responds to signals from a controller, and at least one sensor that the controller uses to ensure that the manufacturing process is proceeding as it should. Most controlled automation processes use several sensors, to detect incoming materials and workplace environmental conditions, as well as to measure and verify the process's output.

Digital computers are used in modem soft automation systems, replacing hard automation controllers. Custom-built analog controllers, traditionally used for process control applications, are examples of "hard" automation. The main advantages to be reaped by using digital control are in the area of increased flexibility. Digital controllers, including PLCs, can be programmed to respond to more conditions, in more ways, and can be reprogrammed more easily than hard automation. The initial system design and building steps are easier, too, because off-the-shelf components can be used.

Numerical controlled (NC) machining components, analog process controllers, and mechanical and electrical sequencers have been available for quite a while, but the development of programmable controllers (PLCs), robots, and open-architecture computers really made automation accessible to the average industrial user. Signal conditioning is still required to get some components to work with other components. While computerized equipment can be programmed to communicate with each other, standardization in communication between computerized equipment is not fully realized yet.

GO TO NEXT PAGE: INDUSTRIAL CONTROL HANDBOOK - 1.0 SENSORS

GO BACK TO PREVIOUS PAGE: INDUSTRIAL CONTROL HANDBOOK - 0.5 INTERFACING AND SIGNAL CONDITIONING

GO TO MAIN PAGE: INDUSTRIAL CONTROL HANDBOOK - TABLE OF CONTENTS

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment

security code
Write the displayed characters


busy

Related Articles

Promotions

  • ...more

Disclaimer

Important: All images are copyrighted to their respective owners. All content cited is derived from their respective sources.

Contact us for information and your inquiries. IAMechatronics is open to link exchanges.

IAMechatronics Login